was/were in the Subjunctive

Transiteration

Pardon me, but I need a moment to rant.

Every day, I have been hearing more and more people saying “was” instead of “were” when they talk in the subjunctive mood. I’m not sure why it, of all things, drive me up a wall, but it does.

When I was working at the ICC (a computer literacy building) for a day, the teacher was having the student write poems. Each poem was written online, on a poem template. Each poem started with the word “If.” The theme of the poems was “becoming a rockstar,” and I kid you not, every single elementary school kid in there started his/her/zir poem “If I was a rockstar…”

It killed me a bit inside, and after class I talked to my professor. (By the way, this happened at my college!) You’d think that at an institution that respects academia would try to propagate…

View original post 237 more words

Subjunctive

The subjunctive mood in English grammar includes particular verb forms that are used in certain clauses, chiefly dependent clauses, to express necessity, desire, purpose, suggestion and similar ideas, or a counterfactual condition.

In Modern English the subjunctive form of a verb is in many cases the same as a corresponding indicative form, and thus subjunctives are not a very visible grammatical feature of English. For most verbs, the only distinct subjunctive form is found in the third-person singular of the present tense, where the subjunctive lacks the -s ending: It is necessary that he see a doctor (contrasted with the indicative he sees). However, the verb be has not only a distinct present subjunctive (be, as in I suggest that they be removed) but also a past subjunctive were (as in If I were rich, …).

These two tenses of the subjunctive have no particular connection in meaning with present and past time. Terminology varies; sometimes what is called the present subjunctive here is referred to simply as the subjunctive, and, the form were may be treated just as an alternative irrealis form of was rather than a past subjunctive.

Another case where present subjunctive forms are distinguished from indicatives is when they are negated: compare I recommend they not enter the competition (subjunctive) with I hope they do not enter the competition (indicative).
Source: Wikipedia

Subjunctive

Subjunctive mood
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The subjunctive is a grammatical mood found in many languages. Subjunctive forms of verbs are typically used to express various states of unreality such as wish, emotion, possibility, judgment, opinion, necessity, or action that has not yet occurred – the precise situations in which they are used vary from language to language. The subjunctive is an irrealis mood (one that does not refer directly to what is necessarily real) – it is often contrasted with the indicative, which is a realis mood.
Subjunctives occur most often, although not exclusively, in subordinate clauses, particularly that-clauses. Examples of subjunctive use can be found in the English sentences “I suggest that you be careful” and “It is important that he stay by your side.” (The corresponding indicative forms of the bolded verbs would be are and stays.)
Subjunctive may be denoted by the glossing abbreviation sjv or sbjv. It is sometimes referred to as the conjunctive mood, as it is mostly found in clauses introduced by a conjunction.

https://www.facebook.com/easyenglish007