POETRY

ll My Love /Led Zeppelin
Should I fall out of love, my fire in the light?
To chase a feather in the wind
Within the glow that weaves a cloak of delight
There moves a thread that has no end

For many hours and days that passes ever soon
The tides have caused the flame to dim
At last the arm is straight, the hand to the loom
Is this to end or just begin?
Led Zeppelin

Elzira Gloriaincredible

I THOUGHT YOU MIGHT LIKE THIS POEM – PLUS IT’S AN INTERESTING IMAGE…

Making a Paper Proposal

Tim's Free English Lesson Plans

Proposal2

This is a lesson plan designed to introduce students to the proposal writing task featured in the CAE writing paper. Below are links to the prezi, the handout, the task and a model answer.

Proposal Task – referred to in the prezi as page 189

Prezi

Proposal Handout

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IELTS Listening Task: Aim for Band 7.5

03.02.14 - Listening Ticket Touts - Questions

Here is a very challenging listening task taken from the BBC. This task is aimed at students aiming for 7.5; students aiming for 6 or 6.5 are likely to find it challenging. Give it your best shot:

We’ll post the answers next week.

  1. What is the name of the owner if the ticket agency?
  2. Where is the ticket agency based?
  3. Name one of the shows that will sell its tickets 6 months in advance
  4. How many day seats might be on sale?
  5. How late was Mary Ann able to get tickets for the theatre?
  6. What is the name of the Chief Executive of the Royal Opera House?
  7. What percentage of tickets is under £40 at the Royal Opera House?
  8. At what prices do the touts resell the tickets?
  9. How long have people been trying to solve the issue of ticket touts?
  10. Where are the reputable ticket sellers listed?

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Paul’s Short Story

Here’s my attempt at a short story – hope it’s not too scary!

A Devilish Death
By
Paul Rafferty

Copyright 2014

Creaking his way along the dusty floorboards, Charlie, trembling with fear gasped as
the axe fell downward just a few feet from his piercing gaze. Embedded upon the
bloodied edge was none other than Gus Langer, the town’s leading neurologist. His
usual pink head and rosy cheeks no longer recognisable as they now resembled a river
of crimson wine.
The skull itself was virtually severed into two equal parts. His lower
torso had been stripped bare of flesh as if ravaged by a swarm of tropical piranhas on
a day trip to Florida’s east coast.

The body crashing to the floor created even more lung filling dust, causing Charlie to
have an uncontrollable coughing fit and finally retching violently, vomited upon the
lifeless naked corpse.
It was at that moment that he heard it, ‘the voice’, a loud
grumbling sound not unlike the announcer at Paddington train station, but this was no
passenger terminus – this was the ‘big house’ of Trots Gray.

“Who are you?” Cried Charlie, picking up the discarded weapon in a vain attempt to
protect himself.

Fortune is said to favour the brave, only on this occasion Charlie was clearly out of
his depth. The blackened spike appeared just once, unlike the grey foggy images ever
present in the ‘big house’.
Charlie felt a shiver down his spine as the “whoosh” of the crimson implement fell in the centre of the of the blonde-haired woman’s decapitated fragile frame.

A single drop of sweat splashed from Charlie’s forehead, landing amidst the cobwebs
and wooden strips which supported the leather-strapped slippers protecting the hairy
exterior of his milky white flesh.
Charlie struggled to control his emotions, his face
reddened by the constant belching and throwing up at the sight of human entrails, the
lump in his throat almost choking him as he screamed aloud.

“‘Who the hell are you?”

SILENCE

Charlie’s limbs became stiff and rigid as a feeling of great pain slowly began to take
hold over his nervous system. All that he could remember was the buzzing of
electricity and the tingling sensation that numbed his entire being. Looking upward
came the sight that Charlie had always feared – the room slowly filling with rabid
bats!

Again Charlie cried!

“Oh my God… Dracula, it’s you!”

The ghostly image emerged swiftly along the filth strewn flooring making its way
towards the pathetic shape of Charles Conroy. With an assumption of anger, Charlie
acted like lightening and quickly grabbed the spike, spinning around as he did so, only
to discover that the white fanged demon had vanished.

“Where are you!” Demanded Charlie.

Turning around, Charlie glanced across the room to where the rumbling sound was
now evident along with the acrid aromatic odour of burning human flesh. A six foot
priest wearing long black robes began laughing aloud:

“Ha, ha, ha. Now it’s your turn!”

“Get away from me or I swear I’ll kill you!” Ranted Conroy.

“Oh not again!” Came the devil’s response.

At that moment a bat swooped down low and tore a small piece of bloodied skin from
Charlie’s left ear.

“Arrgh! Get away! Get away!

The sound of pain echoed the chamber in which Charlie
had now found himself.

Charlie flung the rusty weapon at the low flying vulture as it slowly began to take the
form of a female vampire. Her hair short and fair, rather than the stereotypical long
and dark of fabled legend.
The pure white naked temptress invited Conroy to her side by offering her hand, her silky robe having already been discarded to the scurrying rats that plagued the ground beneath her. A mesmerised Charles ventured closer and closer – then it happened…

The officer speaking in a low voice questioned his colleague.

“Do you think he did it himself?”

“Well, Dr Langer did perform the operation on his girlfriend.” Answered the fellow
officer.

“She died, didn’t she?”

“Maybe Langer killed her because of the affair.”

“What do you mean?” Questioned the guard.

“Well, if she was going to tell Charlie, then the neurologist would have been exposed
to the truth.”

“What is the truth?” Enquired the jailer.

“Who knows, who knows?”

The sound of the 09:27 from Paddington entered the mind of Charles Conroy. He
began bellowing times and destinations again and again like a depraved lunatic.

“9:27 to Trots Gray has just left Paddinglon. All devils leave the big house now!”
“I didn’t kill her!”
“10:15 to Florida come and get me!”
“I am not the one!” “’5:32 to Margate – ten minutes late.”
“Leave me alone!”
“Get away from me!” Charlie’s rarnblings becoming louder and louder with every foaming chant.

The guard placed the leather strap tightly around Conroy’s right arm and then the left.
Charlie’s head jerked sharply back with a resonating crunch that seemed to reflect
from wall to wall. His neck suffered a clean break as the first wave of three 10,000
volts entered his huge mass of blood and bone.

Charlie Conroy was executed at 06:00 on Sunday morning.

The guard smiled … revealing two large white fangs.

End

Old English


Old English; Source: Wikipedia.
Old English (Ænglisc, Anglisc, Englisc) or Anglo-Saxon[1] is an early form of the English language that was spoken and written by the Anglo-Saxons and their descendants in parts of what are now England and southern and eastern Scotland between at least the mid-5th century and the mid-12th century. What survives through writing represents primarily the literary register of Anglo-Saxon.

It is a West Germanic language closely related to Old Frisian and Old Saxon. Old English had a grammar similar in many ways to Classical Latin. In most respects, including its grammar, it was much closer to modern German and Icelandic than to modern English. It was fully inflected with five grammatical cases (nominative, accusative, genitive, dative, and instrumental), three grammatical numbers (singular, plural, and dual) and three grammatical genders (masculine, feminine, and neuter). The dual forms occurred in the first and second persons only and referred to groups of two.

Adjectives, pronouns and (sometimes) participles agreed with their antecedent nouns in case, number and gender. Finite verbs agreed with their subject in person and number.

Nouns came in numerous declensions (with deep parallels in Latin, Ancient Greek and Sanskrit). Verbs came in nine main conjugations (seven strong and two weak), each with numerous subtypes, as well as a few additional smaller conjugations and a handful of irregular verbs. The main difference from other ancient Indo-European languages, such as Latin, is that verbs can be conjugated in only two tenses (vs. the six “tenses” – really tense/aspect combinations – of Latin), and have no synthetic passive voice (although it did still exist in Gothic).

Gender in nouns was grammatical, as opposed to the natural gender that prevails in modern English. That is, the grammatical gender of a given noun did not necessarily correspond to its natural gender, even for nouns referring to people. For example, sēo sunne (the Sun) was feminine, se mōna (the Moon) was masculine, and þat wīf “the woman/wife” was neuter. (Compare German cognates die Sonne, der Mond, das Weib.) Pronominal usage could reflect either natural or grammatical gender, when it conflicted.

From the 9th century, Old English experienced heavy influence from Old Norse, a member of the related North Germanic group of languages.